creature making process – hydrothermal worm

As Sculptris now makes the formerly difficult ‘clay’ modelling process a simple dream, let’s see where this goes…

The aim here is to test some processes and then try to get the form 3d printed or manufactured through a blend of techniques and software processing.

Taking a cool image from the internet as a background to the modelling environment is a good way to start modelling the form…

This is a electron microscope picture of a hydrothermalworm – cool… luckily it’s probably tiny, here’s hoping… so far the teeth and gums are coming along quite nicely – the teeth could take a while so I am skipping them at the moment – this is a quick exercise – 20mins so far…

As you work you can hide elements, then add detail etc.

 

hydrothermal worm, meets robo swimmer with tentacled hands…

I have been creating a ‘kit of parts‘ that can be re-blended to make new forms… so once I get the hang of modelling teeth, gums, skin etc I can move onto the painting side of things – this model is going to be a bit of a ‘dog’s breakfast’ ie everything in it as I am just playing along at the moment and seeing what happens with the tools and the masking / grabbing techniques…

Here the body is working into more detail using the crease, inflate and smooth commands… heavy creasing then calming the effect down with the smoothing command and then inflating for effect at folds etc.

Note: always returning to the decrease mesh brush to ensure the mesh triangle count is not going crazy high without good reason…

The next stage is to finish some details then start painting up…

assembled images before painting in scultpris

I don’t think any more detail is required in terms of geometry, in terms of triangle faces about 1.5million – it’s a guess if this is right as this is my first model in this software, so it’s time to go to the sculptris paint mode – it’s a one way process really so any detail is only going to be added by a texture, colour and bump map process… The pasteup above is with a single shader within sculptris, some fog and depth and a photoshop layer blend…

Just saw this link – could be an interesting skin texture…

Bacterial cells of Staphylococcus aureus, whic...

Bacterial cells of Staphylococcus aureus, which is one of the causal agents of mastitis in dairy cows. Its large capsule protects the organism from attack by the cow’s immunological defenses. This image was taken at 50,000X magnification on a Transmission Electron Microscope of a heavy-metal coated replica of a freeze dried sample, (TEM) Plate #.9514. Sourced from Plate #.9513’s information. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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